BarryHers

Barry Hers Explains How Hasa Is Preventing Evictions and Homelessness in New York City

Landlord and property expert Barry Hers offers insight into New York City’s fight against homelessness and evictions, and support for HIV and AIDS services.

 

Barry HersProperty investor, landlord, and real estate professional Barry Hers explore changes to New York City’s Human Resources Administration’s HIV/AIDS Services Administration policies and initiatives as he reveals more about his support for HASA and other city-wide programs designed to prevent against eviction and homelessness, including the Emergency Rental Assistance Program.

 

“In order to address the importance of preventing evictions and homelessness in New York City, the commissioner of the city’s Human Resources Administration added a new section, known as 5-02, to chapter 5 of title 68 of the so-called ‘Rules of the City of New York’ back in 2014,” reveals Hers, a decades-long veteran of the city’s real estate sector.

 

This provision, he goes on to explain, ensures that individuals living with clinical or symptomatic HIV or AIDS in New York City who is receiving public assistance benefits via the Human Resources Administration’s HIV/AIDS Services Administration—known as HASA—do not pay more than 30 percent of their monthly income toward the cost of rent.

 

“This means that persons living with either symptomatic or asymptomatic AIDS or HIV-related illnesses in New York City do not have to pay more than 30 percent of their earned or unearned income toward the cost of rent which they have a direct obligation to pay each month,” adds Hers, “in an effort to help prevent against evictions and homelessness in the city.”

 

HASA and Barry Hers

Initiatives such as HASA’s housing programs, as well as other city-wide programs including the Emergency Rental Assistance Program, are largely supported by individuals such as Barry Hers and other fellow real estate investors and landlords. “Decades ago now,” Hers continues, “I was actually among the very first landlords here in New York City to embrace the Human Resources Administration’s HIV/AIDS Services Administration’s early housing programs.”

 

Established at the height of New York City’s HIV and AIDS crisis during the 1980s and early 1990s, and today is more widely known simply as HASA, the Human Resources Administration department’s other services, in addition to housing support, including assistance in helping to apply for services such as Medicaid, plus transportation and financial support, mental health and substance abuse screening, treatment referrals, and employment and vocational services.

 

Barry Hers is a respected property investor, landlord, and real estate professional based in Brooklyn and known for his philanthropic nature and charitable efforts. New York City native Hers has now supported programs such as HASA and the Emergency Rental Assistance Program, plus other emergency and non-emergency housing initiatives, for more than a quarter of a century, selflessly entering numerous owned properties in the city into these and other similar schemes. New York City, meanwhile, the most populous and densely populated city in the United States—today home to more than 8.6 million people—is currently focused on financing and administering a plan intended to end HIV and AIDS in the city by the end of the decade.

 

For more information surrounding HASA and other HIV and AIDS services in New York City, as well as for assistance with emergency and non-emergency housing, please visit the Official Website of the City of New York at https://www.nyc.gov.

Barry Hers

Barry Hers discusses involvement with New York’s emergency housing programs

Real estate professional Barry Hers looks back on his decades of support for vital emergency housing programs in New York City.

From the Emergency Rental Assistance Program to HASA, New York’s vulnerable and at-risk populations often rely upon the city’s numerous emergency housing initiatives. A decades-long supporter of these and other vital, much relied upon housing schemes, Barry Hers takes a closer look at both emergency and non-emergency housing and rent assisted accommodation programs available in the Big Apple.

“I’ve always harbored a desire to help those in need, so I’m immensely proud to have been able to lend a much-needed hand to organizations such as HASA and the Emergency Rental Assistance Program and their various projects and services during the last 25 years,” reveals Hers, a native New Yorker and highly-regarded property expert.

HASA—originally the HIV/AIDS Services Administration—exists to assist individuals living in New York City with AIDS or HIV-related illnesses, in order that they may live healthier and more independent lives, according to Barry Hers, with services also recently extended to include low-income residents of the city who are HIV positive but asymptomatic. “HASA also offers a number of other services,” he adds, “including assistance in helping to apply for services such as Medicaid, transportation and cash assistance, mental health and substance abuse screening, treatment referrals, and employment and vocational services.”

The organization, first established in 1985, offers both emergency and non-emergency housing to those eligible for support.

The Emergency Rental Assistance Program, meanwhile, initiated by then-mayor Rudy Giuliani and also favored by his successor, Michael Bloomberg, sees properties such as Hers’ building at 60 Clarkson Avenue become a form of shelter for homeless and less fortunate families and individuals living in New York City.

“I believe I was among the first landlords in New York City to embrace HASA’s housing assistance programs,” reveals Hers. “I’ve been involved with the Emergency Rental Assistance Program since the 90s, too,” he adds, “when, in 1995, I purchased the building at 60 Clarkson Avenue in Prospect Lefferts Gardens.”

Hers and his firm then worked tirelessly, and at significant expense, to renovate the Clarkson Avenue property, before dedicating it to the emergency program in direct response to concerns surrounding growing homelessness in New York City.

Initiatives such as HASA and the Emergency Rental Assistance Program are largely backed by property investors, landlords, and real estate professionals such as Barry Hers, whose offices are based in Brooklyn, close to a number of properties which the New Yorker has selflessly entered into these and other similar schemes.

“It has given me great pleasure,” Barry Hers adds, wrapping up, “and I’m incredibly proud to have been able to make a difference here in New York City.”

Barry Hers

Barry Hers looks at extension of HASA services in New York City

Property mogul and New York City native Barry Hers takes a closer look at the recent changes to HASA program eligibility in the city.

First established in the 1980s and supported by landlords and property investors such as Barry Hers, HASA, as the organization is known today, exists to assist individuals living in New York City with HIV and AIDS. Renamed the Division of AIDS Services and Income Support in 1995, the program became the HIV/AIDS Services Administration—or HASA—in 2000, and, more recently still, was extended to serve thousands of further individuals living in New York City who are HIV positive but asymptomatic.

“Thousands more people are today eligible for assistance with housing, transportation, and food under HASA’s expansion,” adds Barry Hers —one of the first landlords in New York City, he says, to embrace the organization’s early housing assistance efforts—of the ever-evolving state program.

Until the recent extension of HASA’s services was granted, back in 2016, some activists had held fears that an update to the program’s terms would be delayed indefinitely, according to Hers.

Today, however, thousands of low-income New York City residents who are HIV positive but asymptomatic are now able to receive the same assistance as low-income residents of the city who are HIV positive but show symptoms.

“Around 7,000 additional people are understood to have immediately benefited from the changes, and many more since,” points out Hers of the expansion of the program which currently helps in excess of 32,000 people in New York City.

Under the HASA program, New York City’s Human Resources Administration helps individuals suffering from HIV and AIDS who spend upwards of 30 percent of their total income on housing by reimbursing them the difference.

Initiatives such as HASA, as well as the Emergency Rental Assistance Program, are largely supported by individuals such as Barry Hers, whose offices are based in Brooklyn, close to a number of properties which the New Yorker has selflessly entered into these and other similar schemes.

New York City, the most populous and most densely populated city in the United States—home to more than 8.6 million people—is currently focused on financing and administering a plan intended to end HIV and AIDS in the city by the end of the decade.

Barry Hers, meanwhile, is a respected property investor, landlord, and real estate professional known for his charitable efforts and philanthropic nature. Based in Brooklyn, Hers has now supported programs such as HASA and the Emergency Rental Assistance Program for more than a quarter of a century.

Barry Hers - HASA housing program

Barry Hers reveals more about his support for NYC’s HASA housing program

Barry Hers

Landlord and real estate professional Barry Hers looks back on his decades of support for New York City’s HIV/AIDS Services Administration housing program.

Established as the HIV/AIDS Services Administration, HASA—as the organization is known today—is focused on assisting individuals based in New York City living with AIDS or HIV-related illnesses to enjoy healthier and more independent lives. Responsible for a variety of related initiatives, HASA is perhaps best known for its housing program, generously supported by property investors and landlords such as Barry Hers, who here reveals more about his decades of support for HASA and other good causes in the city.

“Originally established in the 1980s, I was among the first landlords in New York to embrace the organization’s housing program here in the city,” reveals Hers of his early support for HASA.

Hers, who owns numerous properties in Brooklyn and elsewhere throughout New York City, is well known for his generosity, having also contributed heavily toward the city’s Emergency Rental Assistance Program in addition to supporting HASA’s housing efforts. “Since initially committing to HASA’s efforts, I’ve housed countless individuals,” says Barry Hers, “at properties including 60 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, and a nearby address on Flatbush Avenue.”

Further to its housing program, the organization also serves to help those in need with personalized service plans designed to target important benefits. “HASA is also dedicated to providing support specific to an individual’s medical situation,” adds Hers, “tailored toward further enhancing their well-being.”

With centers located in all five of New York City’s boroughs, HASA is also committed to providing cash assistance, transportation assistance, home care, mental health and substance abuse screening, treatment referrals, and employment and vocational services.

In addition to properties on Clarkson Avenue and Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn, property investor Hers also owns a plethora of other addresses, many of which have been entered into both HASA and New York City’s Emergency Rental Assistance Program. Hers, as a real estate professional, has also brokered deals on an abundance of other properties in the city intended for dedication to HASA’s housing initiative.

“Over the course of the last three decades,” Barry Hers adds, wrapping up, “I’ve further made it my mission to persuade fellow landlords in New York City to join HASA’s housing program as demand for properties has grown.”

For more information regarding HASA, please visit: https://www1.nyc.gov/site/hra/help/hiv-aids-services.page

Barry Hers - HASA New York

Barry Hers Shares a Brief History of HASA Programs in New York

Prominent New York City landlord and real estate professional Barry Hers offers a look back at the city’s HIV/AIDS Services Administration and its programs.

 

Barry Hers - HASA Programs in New York
Barry Hers – HASA Programs in New York

The HIV/AIDS Services Administration—commonly known as HASA—helps those living in New York City with AIDS or HIV to gain access to benefits and support. HASA clients may receive help with, for example, medical care, as well as direct links to New York City Human Resources Administration services such as food stamps, employment services, and counseling. One of HASA’s most vital and most called upon services, meanwhile, centers around emergency and non-emergency housing assistance, supported by New York City property owners and landlords such as Barry Hers.

 

Hers, a real estate professional who owns properties across the city, including 60 Clarkson Avenue in Brooklyn plus a nearby address on Flatbush Avenue, among many others, was, he says, one of the first landlords in New York City to embrace HASA’s housing assistance programs. “What we today know as HASA was first created in 1985 as a unit serving those with HIV and AIDS,” he explains, “before it expanded into the so-called Division of AIDS Services and Income Support, 10 years later, in 1995.”

 

Barry Hers & HIV/AIDS Services Administration

Hers continues, “A further five years on, in 2000, the Division of AIDS Services and Income Support was renamed the HIV/AIDS Services Administration, or HASA, as it remains today.”

 

HASA is part of the New York City Human Resources Administration, a department of the government of the city, in charge of the majority of its social services programs. Other services and programs within the New York City Human Resources Administration, intended to promote employment and personal responsibility, and to provide temporary assistance and work support, include the Family Independence Administration, Employment Services, the Long Term Care Services Program, the Home Care Services Program, the Office of Domestic Violence, the Office of Child Support Services, Adult Protective Services, the Home Energy Assistance Program, and the Office of Citywide Health Insurance Access.

 

While the state of New York is divided into fifty-eight local social services districts, New York City itself, which is comprised of five separate boroughs, or counties, forms just one individual district. Outside of New York City, each of the remaining districts corresponds to only one individual county, or borough equivalent, according to Hers. “Here in New York City, HASA currently operates confidential offices and housing programs across all five of the city’s boroughs,” he adds.

 

Further to programs tailored toward providing safe, clean housing for those suffering from AIDS and HIV-related illnesses, HASA also offers a number of other services. These include assistance in helping to apply for services such as Medicaid, transportation and cash assistance, mental health and substance abuse screening, treatment referrals, and employment and vocational services.

 

More recently, HASA services were also extended to low-income residents of New York City who are HIV positive but asymptomatic. “It’s estimated that the organization’s programs currently help upwards of 32,000 people here in the city,” adds Barry Hers, wrapping up.

Barry Hers

Barry Hers continues to champion New York City’s housing programs

New York City property professional Barry Hersko reveals more about his support for the city’s predominantly health and family-focused housing programs.

From HASA housing initiatives to the Emergency Rental Assistance Program, Brooklyn’s Barry Hers has supported a number of vital housing programs in New York City during his decades-long career as a real estate professional and property investor. Spending tens of millions of dollars on renovations and the ongoing maintenance of buildings dedicated to such programs, the New York City native continues to champion the hard work of many of the city’s health, family, and homelessness-focused charities and organizations.

“Originally established as the HIV/AIDS Services Administration, I’ve thus far provided more than two decades of support to HASA’s vital housing programs in New York City,” reveals Hersko.

Providing what the organization calls ‘safe, clean accommodation’ for those suffering from AIDS and HIV-related illnesses, HASA’s housing programs are largely supported by property investors, landlords, and real estate professionals such as Barry Hers and his colleagues.

Revealing more about his support for HASA, Hersko continues, “I first became involved with the organization shortly after its inception, established at the height of New York City’s HIV and AIDS crisis during the 1980s and early 1990s.”

Further to its vital housing programs, HASA’s initiatives have grown to include assistance in helping to apply for services such as Medicaid, transportation and cash assistance, mental health and substance abuse screening, treatment referrals, and employment and vocational services. “Among HASA’s primary focuses, however, are its programs tailored toward providing safe housing for those suffering from AIDS and HIV-related illnesses,” adds Hers, whose properties throughout New York City include 60 Clarkson Avenue and a nearby address on Flatbush Avenue, both in Brooklyn, among many others across the city’s five boroughs.

One of the first landlords in New York City to embrace HASA’s housing programs, Hersko has also spent many years involved with other homelessness and housing-focused initiatives, including the Emergency Rental Assistance Program. “The program,” he explains, “was first initiated, and then further supported, by New York City mayors Rudy Giuliani and Michael Bloomberg.”

Since the Emergency Rental Assistance Program was first established, properties such as Hers’ building at 60 Clarkson Avenue have been utilized by the city as a form of rent assisted shelter for less fortunate families and individuals, kindly supported by landlords such as Hersko and his associates. “As a family man,” he adds, “I’ve simply never been able to handle the thought of other families being homeless here in Brooklyn and throughout New York City.”

Hers estimates that, since the early 1990s, he’s housed hundreds of families and thousands of people in need of help, either financially or as a result of serious illness, including AIDS and HIV-related conditions.

“I’m immensely proud,” Barry Hers adds, wrapping up, “to have been able to assist those who are sick or otherwise in need of housing assistance in New York City via initiatives such as the Emergency Rental Assistance Program, and those run by the wonderful people at HASA.”

Barry Hers - HASA housing program

Barry Hers Offers an Insight Into New York City’s Hasa Housing Programs

Barry Hers Offers an Insight Into New York City’s Hasa Housing Programs

Originally established as the HIV/AIDS Services Administration, Barry Hers shares details of his three decades of support for HASA’s vital housing programs.

 

Barry Hers & HASA
Barry Hers & HASA

Providing safe, clean accommodation for those suffering from AIDS and HIV-related illnesses, HASA’s housing programs in New York City are supported by local property investors, landlords, and real estate professionals such as Barry Hers. Based in Brooklyn, Hers offers an insight into what has grown to become one of NYC’s most vital housing programs as he shares more about his three decades of support for the city-wide organization.

 

“I first became involved with HASA, or the HIV/AIDS Services Administration as it was then known, shortly after its inception,” reveals Hers, who owns properties across the city, including 60 Clarkson Avenue in Brooklyn and a further, nearby address on Flatbush Avenue, among others, “and was one of the first landlords in New York City to do so.”

 

Established at the height of New York City’s HIV and AIDS crisis during the 1980s and early 1990s, HASA’s varied range of initiatives—which today includes assistance in helping to apply for services such as Medicaid, transportation and cash assistance, mental health and substance abuse screening, treatment referrals, and employment and vocational services—quickly grew to include programs tailored toward providing safe, clean housing for those suffering from AIDS and HIV-related illnesses.

 

“This is where I was able to lend the biggest hand,” explains Hers, “dedicating apartment buildings and other properties—which I’d put my own money, blood, and sweat into renovating and maintaining at a cost of many millions of dollars—to good causes, such as HASA, which operates confidential offices and housing programs across all five New York City boroughs.”

 

Around the same time, Barry Hers had also become involved with other housing programs in New York City, including the Emergency Rental Assistance Program. The program, initiated and further supported by New York City mayors Rudy Giuliani and Michael Bloomberg, has seen properties such as Hers’ building at 60 Clarkson Avenue become a form of rent assisted shelter for less fortunate families and individuals living in the city.

 

“Since the early 1990s, I’ve housed hundreds of families and thousands of people who have found themselves in need of help, either financially or as a result of serious illness, including AIDS and HIV-related conditions,” reveals Hers.

 

“As a family man, I’ve simply never been able to bear the thought of other families being homeless,” he adds, wrapping up, “and, furthermore, I’m also immensely proud to have been able to help those who are sick and in need of housing assistance in New York City via programs such as those run by HASA.”

 

For more information regarding HASA, please visit: https://www1.nyc.gov/site/hra/help/hiv-aids-services.page

Barry Hers

Barry Hers recalls early backing of New York City’s HIV/AIDS Services Administration programs

Property investor and real estate professional Barry Hers looks back on his early adoption of HIV/AIDS Services Administration housing programs in New York City.

New York City real estate professional and property investor Barry Hers has enjoyed an illustrious, decades-long career during which he’s supported a wide variety of charities and good causes throughout the city. From the Emergency Rental Assistance Program to the city’s HIV/AIDS Services Administration’s emergency housing schemes, the property sector veteran reflects on his support for early efforts to safely house those suffering from AIDS and associated illnesses.

“Beginning in the 1990s, I’ve continued to support New York City’s HIV/AIDS Services Administration, or HASA, for almost 30 years now,” reveals Hers, who’s based in the southwesternmost part of Brooklyn, close to two of his investment properties, both of which have been volunteered in support of HASA and Emergency Rental Assistance Program initiatives.

First established in New York City in 1985, HASA was founded to assist individuals living with AIDS and HIV-related illnesses, so that they may live healthier and more independent lives. Initially becoming involved with the organization’s early housing programs during the 1990s, Barry Hers was among New York City’s first landlords to embrace the cause.

“Throughout the years, I’ve housed many hundreds of tenants as part of both emergency and non-emergency HASA housing programs,” Barry Hers reveals, “at properties such as 60 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, and a further, nearby address on Flatbush Avenue, among others.”

60 Clarkson Avenue is a particularly noteworthy property, having undergone a multi-million dollar renovation project courtesy of Hers before being entered into HASA’s housing schemes, as well as New York City’s Emergency Rental Assistance Program. “We successfully transformed 60 Clarkson Avenue into a truly wonderful place to live in the bustling borough of Brooklyn,” adds Hers of the popular and well-known apartment building.

Furthermore, Hers has brokered numerous deals on various other properties for HASA programs in the city during the last three decades. “I’ve also worked closely with fellow landlords in New York City to persuade them, too, to support the organization’s much-called-for housing programs as demand for properties has grown over the years,” he adds, wrapping up.

In addition to housing support, other HASA solutions currently available include assistance in helping to successfully apply for services such as Medicaid, cash assistance, transportation assistance, mental health screening, substance abuse screening, treatment referrals, and employment and vocational services. For more information regarding HASA, please visit: https://www1.nyc.gov/site/hra/help/hiv-aids-services.page

Barry Hers

Barry Hers reflects on support for HASA programs in New York City

New York’s Barry Hers reflects on his support for the city’s HIV/AIDS Services Administration programs from the 1990s through today.

Well known for his generosity, having contributed heavily toward New York City’s Emergency Rental Assistance Program in recent years, property investor and real estate professional Barry Hers looks back on his support for HIV/AIDS Services Administration, or HASA, programs in NYC, beginning in the 1990s and continuing to the present day.

“First established in 1985, HASA exists to assist individuals living with AIDS or HIV-related illnesses, in order that they may live healthier and more independent lives,” reveals Hers, who owns numerous properties in Brooklyn and elsewhere throughout New York City, “myself being among the first landlords in NYC to embrace the initiative’s early housing programs during the 1990s.”

Since then, the organization has continuously served to help those in need with personalized service plans designed to target necessary benefits, as well as to provide support specific to an individual’s medical situation, and which will enhance their well-being. “Over the years, I’ve housed hundreds of tenants as part of both emergency and non-emergency HASA housing programs,” says Hers, whose properties include 60 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn, and a nearby address on Flatbush Avenue, among many others.

One of several of Hers’ properties in Brooklyn, 60 Clarkson Avenue—in the Flatbush area of the borough, close to the attractive residential neighborhood of Prospect Lefferts Gardens—was first acquired by the real estate professional in 1995. The property was promptly subject to a multi-million dollar renovation project before being entered into both various HASA programs and the city’s Emergency Rental Assistance Program. “My team and I transformed 60 Clarkson Avenue into a truly wonderful place to live in the bustling borough of Brooklyn,” adds Hers—whose offices are located on 52nd Street, in the southwestern part of the same NYC borough—of the completed work.

Furthermore, Barry Hers has brokered numerous deals on apartments for HASA programs over the course of the last three decades, while simultaneously convincing fellow landlords in New York City to join the initiative’s programs as demand for properties grew. “HASA clients,” he adds, “receive ongoing case management, and are assigned to their own caseworker at one of the organization’s numerous centers which can be found in all five of New York City’s boroughs.”

HASA solutions currently include assistance in helping to successfully apply for services such as Medicaid and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits, as well as emergency and non-emergency transitional housing, cash assistance, transportation assistance, home care, mental health and substance abuse screening and treatment referrals, and employment and vocational services.

Barry Hers remains one of a growing number of landlords in New York City who have generously supported HASA since its inception. “I’ve always harbored a desire to help those in need, so I’m immensely proud to have been able to lend a much-needed hand to HASA and the organization’s various projects and services during the last 25 years,” he adds, wrapping up.

Barry Hers

Flatbush, Brooklyn Apartment Building Restored By Barry Hers

Barry Hers Shares the Tale of His Renovated Flatbush, Brooklyn Apartment Building

Barry Hers - Flatbush Brooklyn Apartments
Barry Hers – Flatbush Brooklyn Apartments

Property investor and real estate professional Barry Hers shed some light on the background of his renovated Prospect Lefferts Gardens area apartment building.

 

Following a multi-million dollar renovation project, real estate industry professional and property investor Barry Hers shares a closer look at his building at 60 Clarkson Avenue in the Flatbush area of Brooklyn, close to the attractive residential neighborhood of Prospect Lefferts Gardens.

 

“I originally purchased the building in 1995,” explains Hers of the property which sits at 60 Clarkson Avenue in the Flatbush area of the borough of Brooklyn.

 

The site was in a state of complete disrepair, according to Hers, having accrued over 1,500 Department of Housing Preservation and Development violations under its previous owners. “60 Clarkson Avenue was also blighted by another 100 or more building code breaches,” he points out.

 

Now in possession of the keys to 60 Clarkson Avenue, Hers spent several million dollars renovating the property in order to remedy its building code breaches and other violations. “My team and I transformed 60 Clarkson Avenue into an utterly appealing place to live in the bustling borough of Brooklyn,” recalls the property investor and real estate professional, whose offices are located on 52nd Street, in the southwestern part of the same New York City borough.

 

Barry Hers in 2019

Today, Barry Hers estimates that he’s poured more than 10 million dollars into renovations and ongoing maintenance at the address. “Having always harbored a desire to help the less fortunate, shortly after completion of the initial renovations, I entered the building into New York’s Emergency Assistance Rental Program in direct response to concerns surrounding growing homelessness in New York City,” he reveals.

 

The New York native ultimately dedicated the building to the emergency program, first initiated by then-mayor Rudy Giuliani and subsequently favored by Michael Bloomberg. “In doing so, 60 Clarkson Avenue became a place of shelter for less fortunate families and individuals living in the city,” explains Hers.

 

More recently, however, and with a subsequent administration has taken over the city and its programs, making huge cuts to funding for the homeless and disadvantaged, an end has largely been put to initiatives such as the Emergency Assistance Rental Program of which Hers and his building were apart. “The news,” he adds, “has taken a great emotional toll on me personally.”

 

Unable, therefore, to continue his efforts, and having selflessly housed over 350 homeless families since 2015 alone, despite receiving no financial compensation, Hers has today been forced to reevaluate the rent-stabilized nature of operations at the address. “I think it’s now time,” he adds, wrapping up “for the start of a new era at 60 Clarkson Avenue.”